Improve Your Image

 

1. Touch-up facial features step-by-step with your favorite software

  1. Remove Red Eye

  2. Whiten & Brighten Teeth

  3. Smooth Skin, Conceal Blemishes & Erase Wrinkles

  4. Enhance A Portrait with a Soft Focus or Diffusion Filter Effect I

  5. Enhance A Portrait with a Soft Focus or Diffusion Filter Effect II

2.

 

1.1 How to Remove Red Eye in Photoshop (any Version)
From your Graphics Software Guide

It's the perfect picture... except it's been ruined by those unsightly, glowing red eyes from camera flash. It's happened to us all; and fortunately, it's fairly easy to correct.

Difficulty Level: Easy    Time Required: 5 minutes

Here's How:

  1. Open the image.
  2. Go to Image > Duplicate and close the original.
  3. Go to View > New View. This will open a duplicate window of the same image.
  4. Zoom one of the windows so that you can see the eyes as large as possible. Set the other window view to 100%.
  5. Arrange the two windows so you can see both the zoomed view and the 100% view at the same time.
  6. Create a new layer.
  7. Use the eyedropper to pick up a color from the iris of the eye. It should be a fairly gray tint with a hint of the eye color.
  8. Paint over the red part of the eye on the new layer, being careful not to paint over the eyelids.
  9. Go to Filters > Blur > Gaussian and give it about a 1 pixel blur to soften the edges.
  10. Set the layer blend mode to Saturation. This will take the red out without removing the highlights, but in many cases it leaves the eyes too gray and hollow looking.
  11. If that's the case, duplicate the saturation layer and change the blend mode to Hue. That should put some color back in while still preserving the highlights.
  12. If the color is too strong after adding a Hue layer, lower the opacity of the Hue layer.
  13. When you're happy with the results you can merge the extra layers down.

Tips:

  1. If you need to darken the pupil area, use the burn tool. It should only take a couple of taps with the burn tool to darken the pupils.
  2. This technique works in Photoshop 4 and up, including Photoshop LE and Photoshop Elements.

 

1.2 How to Whiten Teeth in Photoshop (any Version)
From your Graphics Software Guide

You don't need special toothpaste if you've got Photoshop! The dodge tool makes quick work of whitening and brightening your smile.

Difficulty Level: Easy    Time Required: 5 minutes

Here's How:

  1. Open the image.
  2. Go to Image > Duplicate and close the original.
  3. Go to View > New View. This will open a duplicate window of the same image.
  4. Zoom one of the windows so that you can see the teeth as large as possible. Set the other window view to 100%.
  5. Arrange the two windows so you can see both the zoomed view and the 100% view at the same time.
  6. Select the Dodge tool.
  7. In the options palette select midtones and set the exposure to about 20%.
  8. Select a small, soft brush. Be sure the brush is smaller than the teeth.
  9. Carefully paint over the teeth with the dodge tool.
     

Tips:

  1. Too much brightness will make the image look faked. If you overdo it, go to Filter > Fade Dodge Tool.
  2. For better accuracy, select the teeth before working with the dodge tool.

 

1.3 How to Smooth Skin and Conceal Blemishes With Photoshop 5 and Up
From your Graphics Software Guide

Wouldn't we all like to look a few years younger or magically erase facial blemishes? Luckily we can turn back the clock digitally with the appropriately-named history brush in Photoshop 5 and up.

Difficulty Level: Average    Time Required: 10 minutes

Here's How:

  1. Open the image.
  2. Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.
  3. Set the radius just high enough to conceal any wrinkles or blemishes. Anything over 1 or 2 pixels is probably too much. Click OK to apply the gaussian blur.
  4. If the History palette is not visible, go to Window > Show History.
  5. Click the small arrow in the upper right corner of the history palette and choose New Snapshot. Name the snapshot "blurred".
  6. At the top of the History palette, click the first snapshot to revert back to the original image state. It should have the same name as your filename.
  7. Click in the square next to the blurred snapshot to set it as the source for the history brush.
  8. Create a new layer.
  9. Select the History brush.
  10. Choose a soft brush and paint on the new layer. You will be applying paint from the blurred snapshot source image.
  11. See the tips below to refine your touch-ups.
  12. When you are happy with the final image, choose Layer > Merge Down to combine the retouched layer with the original image. There's no going back after you merge the layers.

Tips:

  1. Use the [bracket keys] to increase or decrease the brush size as you paint.
  2. Use the number keys to adjust the opacity of the brush as you paint (1=10%, 2=20%, and so on).
  3. Be careful not to paint over areas of fine detail. If you do, remember you are working on a new layer so you can use the eraser tool if you overdo an area.
  4. You can toggle the layer visibility on and off by clicking the eye in the layers palette. This will let you compare your touch-ups to the original as you work.

1.4 How to Enhance A Portrait - Method 1 - Photoshop/Elements
From your Graphics Software Guide

This simple technique works especially well on portraits, but don't hesitate to try it on other types of images. The effect produces a warm glow, softening details and diminishing noise and artifacts.

Here's How:

  1. Open the photo.
  2. Duplicate the background layer by dragging it to the new layer icon on the layers palette.
  3. Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Set the radius to 10 pixels and click OK.
  4. Set the blend mode of the blurred layer to soft light.
  5. Optional: reduce the opacity of the blurred layer to slightly reduce this effect.

Tips:

  1. Experiment with other blend modes such as screen, hard light, overlay or others.
  2. Screen will lighten the photo, so try it on photos that are too dark. Hard light and overlay will darken the picture, so try it on photos that are too light.
  3. The darken blend mode sometimes produces a watercolor-like effect.
  4. If you don't like the effect in certain areas of the image you can erase portions of the top layer with a soft brush.

 

1.5 How to Enhance A Portrait - Method 2 - Photoshop
From your Graphics Software Guide

This technique is great for portraits. It's also good for reducing JPEG artifacts. It mimics a diffusion filter, softening the photo, reducing harsh lines and wrinkles, and intesifying the colors.

Here's How:

  1. Open the photo.
  2. Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.
  3. Set the radius to 4-10 pixels (use a high amount for hi-res images, low amount for low-res) and click OK.
  4. Go to Edit > Fade Gaussian Blur. (Note: This command is under the Filter menu in older Photoshop versions.)
  5. Set the fade opacity to 50%.
  6. Merge this layer down (Ctrl+E/Command+E).
  7. Go to Filter > Sharpen > Unsharp Mask.
  8. Experiment within the following ranges: Amount: 80-200, Radius: 2-5, Threshold: 10-15.
  9. Go to Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Hue/Saturation.
  10. Move the saturation slider up to somewhere in the 10-20 range and click OK.